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HPR 98 | Changing Lives Through Music

Heartrepreneur® Radio | Episode 98 | Changing Lives Through Music With Jada Vance

HPR 98 | Changing Lives Through Music

Instant fame is a double-edged sword: it can be used for you or against you. From being the popular cheerleader, playing sports, and participating in extracurricular activities, you might go to the top or bottom of the totem pole. This was exactly what Jada Vance faced after being eliminated from American Idol. But she managed to get up and wipe away the tears by turning her tragedy into a triumph. Jada used her fame by spreading her country music, spunky attitude, and contagious smile as an advocate for childhood cancer, veteran interests, and MRSA awareness. The small-town Tennessee native has worked with some of classic country’s best, including Linda Davis and Teddy Gentry. Her previous single, Hick N Roll, hit country radio late 2017, with its music video debuting nationally on Heartland TV. Her latest track, There’s Always Me, is being played across the US and internationally. Jada’s incredible story exemplifies the traits of being a Heartrepreneur: authenticity, transparency and integrity. Just showing up and being who you are. If people like it, awesome. If people don’t dig it, that’s just as awesome!

 

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Changing Lives Through Music With Jada Vance

I’ve been looking forward to this episode. I have someone interesting for you. From American Idol to the film Providence and multiple charity performances, country artist, Jada Vance, is always spreading her good-time, spunky attitude and contagious smile. I spent some time looking at her photos and all of them made me smile. The small-town Tennessee native has worked with some of classic country’s best, including Linda Davis and Teddy Gentry. She has brought her energetic performances to the stage, opening for Daryle Singletary, Travis Tritt, Little Texas and Little Big Town. When she is not writing songs or teaching young children at Cheerleading Camps, Jada can be found dedicating her time as an advocate for childhood cancer, veteran interests and MRSA awareness. Her previous single, Hick ‘N Roll, hit country radio late 2017 and the music video debuted nationally on Heartland TV. Her newest track, There’s Always Me, impacted country radio and is being played across the US and internationally. Jada Vance, welcome to Heartrepreneur Radio.

Thank you so much for having me.

I was attracted to you, first of all, your energy. It comes across in your photos, it comes across in your music, and it definitely comes across in how you give back to the world. How did you decide that music was the thing and how did you know?

I didn’t honestly think that music was what I was going to do for the rest of my life. I had all my goals set out. In freshman year high school, I was going to be a journalist. My friend’s mom dared me to try out for American Idol and that’s where my musical professional journey began. I’ve always sang ever since I can remember but I didn’t never think that it was going to be something that I was going to do after I got kicked off of Idol.

I’ve interviewed some other people who were on Idol and many of them say, “When I got kicked off of Idol, it always makes me laugh.” I love the way that you keep up with being energetic about what you do and it’s obvious you love what you do. Tell me about that. How is that good for you?

Why would you get yourself into something that you didn’t love if it could be a long-term goal? I thought about it and got some good advice from some of my mentors, my mom, my grandparents, my family, and friends. I felt the support team and everybody helped guide me in that direction.

My first book that I wrote twenty years ago was called Work Yourself Happy. You’re a true example of that. How come you decided to also dedicate time to whether it’s veterans or cancer? What brings those things to light for you?

Personal experience. Mostly seeing close people to me are going through cancer, heart diseases. They are young people. It’s seriously surreal sometimes. It’s crazy that this little kid, literally ten years old, is diagnosed by stage four lung cancer and they can’t do anything. It’s literally a waiting game. If I can go in, help somebody and brighten their day for 30 minutes or an hour, I’m going to do that. How do you explain that to those kids? It’s unexplainable and I feel like there are no real words to place upon it other than I love giving back. If you’re not, then I don’t know what purpose.

The word that we use is Heartrepreneur and it is people who do business and life with heart and thinking outside of themselves. Clearly, that’s you dedicating your time and energy to many different things. How do you come to write your songs? Having interviewed many musicians over the years, I find songwriters fascinating on what their process is. How does that work for you?

I don’t have a set in stone layout as to how I write. I feel like every single write that I go into, whether it be me sitting down with my own guitar or doing a co-write with somebody, I feel like it always differs depending on who I’m writing with. We typically sit down and open up, sitting down and being an open book and telling people all your stuff, which is hard to do sometimes. Once you do it many times, it gets easier. You’ve got to let it all out, that’s what I do. I find that easiest. I’m like, “Here’s my life. If you don’t like it then I don’t know what to tell you.”

We always talk about authenticity, transparency, and integrity, just showing up and being who you are. If people like it, awesome. If people don’t dig it, that’s just as awesome. What are your goals? What are your aspirations over the coming years? What do you want to happen for you in your life?

Probably in the next five or six years, I would love to have a Grammy. That would be amazing. We’re working hard. I’ve been shopping around for different producers who I thought I might get in touch. This guy’s name is Ted and he’s absolutely amazing. He possibly could be my Grammy producer. We’re getting the wheels rolling for bigger picture stuff and that’s where that falls.

I always love to ask a question about any hiccups that you’ve had in your life, something that wasn’t quite right in your life or your work that you overcame and how you did it.

Do you want it to be personal or do you want it to be industry-wise?

Whatever you think would help lift other people up and show them that, “You can get through it and keep going.”

I had an interview with Women Who Triumph and I said the same thing when they asked me this question. When I was in high school, because that’s when I tried out for American Idol, I was a sophomore in high school, so I was sixteen years old. That’s a pretty young age to get yourself into something that big. I had to grow up fast but I felt like people around me, when I did come back to school, I thought people around me didn’t take that well and they automatically were like, “She’s this and she’s that. She thinks she’s better than this person or whatever.” I’m also from a small town so everybody knows what’s going on everybody’s life. There’s not any privacy. They all think that they know. That’s the key.

I don’t want to say boring because that’s a super strong word. I guess you could say it. I went through a lot of stuff so I ended up graduating early from high school because it was tough. Whenever I came back I didn’t have any friends. I went from being the popular cheerleader, playing all these sports, all these extracurricular activities to literally the bottom of the totem pole. That was something that was extremely hard for me. I honestly don’t know what I would’ve done without my close friends and my close family. Big people go through that a lot.

I find it interesting because sometimes people see celebrities as having a perfect charmed life and everything has always been magnificent and perfect. It’s important for people to know that we all have had some things that weren’t quite right. It has a lot to do with our support system as well as our attitude moving us through. I do have a question. When you’re kicked off of Idol, was that difficult? Was that emotional?

I told my mom, “If I get kicked off, I’m not going to be one of these people you see on TV kicking and screaming, throwing stuff at the camera.” I was like, “I’m not going to do that because that’s what they want,” because it’s TV. They’re going to do whatever they can do get their ratings and I completely understand. I was not going to be one of those people. They have millions of other people to choose from but not me. That’s how I went into that and when I got kicked off I toughened up, I got some tough skin about me and I walked right out of there. They interviewed me and they were like, “Are you not emotional?” I was like, “I’m feeling a little something inside but I’m not going to let you all know that. I’m not giving you the reality of that.” If you’re strong-willed and like, “This is what I’m going to do and this is not what I’m going to do,” the path’s pretty clear.

HPR 98 | Changing Lives Through Music
Changing Lives Through Music: You’ve got to let it all out.

I always say, “Find a way or make a way.” If something doesn’t work the way you thought it was going to be, it’s like, “I’ll find another way to do it.” You found a great way to do it. You’re rocking it and being so successful and I’m really excited for you. How can people connect with you and hear more about you? Follow you, find your music and all that cool stuff?

Everybody can go to www.JadaVance.com or on all of my social media. All of my handles are just @JadaVanceMusic. It’s super easy to find. Go follow me.

I highly recommend that folks do for a couple reasons. Number one, you’re going to dig her music. Number two, it’s who she is. It is this attitude. You have beauty that’s not just external, it’s internal and I just want to thank you.

Thank you.

You’re welcome. I want to thank you for sharing your beauty and impacting the world through who you are as well as through your music.

Thank you so much. I really appreciate it.

You are welcome. Please, go over to JadaVance.com. Make sure that you get to know more about this woman because I have found her to be one of the people to follow and people to watch. I just speak from my heart and that’s the truth from me. Thanks again, Jada, for joining us on Heartrepreneur Radio.

Thank you so much for having me. God bless.

It’s been a pleasure. For the audience, make sure that you do subscribe because if you didn’t, you’ll miss the upcoming interviews that are going to be amazing. If you like the show, love to have your five stars. We’d love to have your reviews and for you to share the show. Thanks again for tuning in at Heartrepreneur Radio.

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About Jada Vance

HPR 98 | Changing Lives Through MusicFrom American Idol to the film Providence, and multiple charity performances, country artist,Jada Vance, is always spreading her good-time, spunky attitude and contagious smile. The small-town Tennessee native has worked with some of classic country’s best, including Linda Davis and Teddy Gentry, and has brought her energetic performances to the stage, opening for Daryle Singletary, Travis Tritt, Little Texas. When she is not writing songs or teaching young children at Cheerleading Camps, Jada can be found dedicating her time as an advocate for childhood cancer, veterans interests and MRSA awareness.  Jada’s previous single, “Hick N Roll,” hit country radio late 2017, and the music video debuted nationally on Heartland TV.  Her newest track “There’s Always Me” is currently being played on country radio around the world.

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